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  • kencabbit

    kencabbit

    March 10, 2015, 6:26 pm

    While the underlying motivation might be exactly what you say (fear), this is not the intended message.

    For people who would make this statement, the presence of faith removes the *need* for further questioning. This kind of faith means you already know the truth (or in the case of religion--know where the authority of truth lies), and so there is no further need to personally seek truth in that area... and thus no more questions to ask.

    Of course, this is just blatantly stupid, even for most theists.

    *typo

    Reply

  • intangible-tangerine

    intangible-tangerine

    March 10, 2015, 7:06 am

    I know but I stick to cus generally, I ONLY usually write because in very formal contexts (e.g job applications) or if I'm feeling especially fond of typing. For me it would be like writing omniubus when I mean bus, it's a contraction that everyone knows and uses so I think it's just beyond the pale for people to be pedantic about it.

    It's not a mistake by the way, it's a stylistic choice. I get you're not trying to be annoying but too many people are scornful of any diversion from prescriptivist language yet very few actually understand where those rules come from or the nature of language change. If it weren't for people like me using the occasional informal construction of neologism we'd still be saying 'hath' and distinguishing between 'thou and ye.' I'd much rather have people be a little loose with language and risk the occasional break down in communication than have it be fossilised. Think of the poor lexicographers and etymologists of the future if there's nothing new for them to study.

    Reply

  • ryancarnated

    ryancarnated

    March 10, 2015, 3:33 pm

    There should indeed be dark matter in our solar system, and it should be flying through the earth which should be detectable with a sensitive enough device.

    However, the distribution of dark matter in the solar system would not be the same kind of distribution as our galaxy as a whole. It should be uniformly distributed in the solar system, but in our galaxy the density should decrease as you move away from the center.

    What this means is the the effect of dark matter on bodies in the solar system would be exactly the same for each body. The solar system as a whole would be tugged the same way, but from body to body the effect would be negligible.

    Yes, it's true that dark matter is typically moving too fast to orbit the sun. Think about how the solar system formed: A rotating ball of gas condensed and heated up. As it heated up, it radiated that energy away, and hence condensed some more, and heated up some more, and so on. Dark matter could not have been a part of this process, because it would fly right through the cloud with almost no interaction whatsoever. Only baryonic matter interacting through electromagnetism (and gravity) could condense in this way. Thus our sun and planets are made of baryonic matter. The only dark matter would the ambient dark matter that is in our region of the galaxy.

    The galaxy formed in a completely different way. It formed from a primordial clump of dark matter, which pulled the baryonic matter in a little bit. Then the baryonic matter heated up and condensed, etc. So in the case of the galaxy, the dark matter was there first. In the case of the solar system, the baryonic matter condensed in a way that had nothing to do with dark matter (at least, as far as I know).

    Reply

  • qlqropi

    qlqropi

    March 10, 2015, 7:08 pm

    Depends where you are. At the theoretical side, CS is a domain of math: the study of computation, information, and (some would say) thought itself. You can be a world-respected computer scientist without writing a line of code (besides LaTeX). At most schools, this theoretical aspect will be part but not all of a CS degree.

    It's also important to understand what "software engineering" is. There are skills and methodologies relevant to working on large, real-world software projects with many developers. They're not especially related to the theory of computation, nor to electrical engineering. Your school may or may not even teach this.

    But yeah, you should learn everything.

    Reply

  • knitmensch

    knitmensch

    March 10, 2015, 4:39 pm

    Learn some pre-industrial skills, aka survival skills. Can you produce a garment? Preserve foods? Grow foods? Weld? Build wooden furniture?

    Classes are available in many of these, and you might meet some interesting people there. (For instance, you don't say whether you're a heterosexual male, but assuming you are for a moment: knitting classes/circles have a growing concentration of young women in them. You might not feel smart there, but you can challenge yourself to learn something new, and meet a lot of women who never thought a man would appreciate their hobby. And when the apocalypse comes, you'll have socks and sweaters for life, provided you also learn to spin. :)

    Reply

  • shockfactor

    shockfactor

    March 10, 2015, 5:55 pm

    I'd suggest that you figure out what good delivery places are around and start using them.

    If you close your windows, you shouldn't smell anything outside. If you do, you can get something like an ionic breeze to make the place smell clean.

    Having a single room isn't a big issue if you're single. You can setup cubicle-like walls if it becomes an issue.

    I've never needed to use a subway. If you limit your groceries to what you'll immediately need you shouldn't have more than a single bag. (Its not like you're getting entire hams and gallons of milk).

    Oh, and get used to walking.

    Reply

  • klarth

    klarth

    March 10, 2015, 10:36 am

    I find it absolutely barbaric that people - *politicians* - can get by on supporting their criticisms of video games with nothing but misinformation. This woman's main point of contention was that GTA IV was some sort of "rape simulator", and, unless my memory's playing tricks on me, even allowed the player to roam about in a playground massacring children. It's a crying shame that there are people out there dense enough to believe that sort of tripe.

    The stigma attached to video games has always been utterly unfounded. As far as I know, there's never been any such furore surrounding modern films or literature, and everyone today realises just how unbelievably idiotic the concept of music censorship is. I don't know anyone who considers the efforts of Tipper Gore and the PMRC anything other than a hilarious joke. The main issue is a severe shortage of people willing to exercise some cynicism.

    The fact remains that there no link between media and objectionable behaviour has ever been established. I've no doubt that spreading the notion that the viewing of Greek sculptures depicting uncovered genitalia could potentially turn an otherwise normal person into a serial rapist would earn me no end of derision.

    edit: Apparently she also says it's "degrading to women". I suppose all fictional male protagonists are similarly degrading by sheer virtue of them not being female, eh? I have no problem whatsoever with the furtherance of women's rights, but persecution complex-afflicted feminists are fucking insidious. As an aside, Fable II allows players to create female characters and go on man-murdering rampages, therefore it's degrading to men. Oh - wait - nobody's allowed to point such things out without being accused of misogyny. How *dreadfully* thoughtless of me.

    Reply

  • usr211211212

    usr211211212

    March 10, 2015, 10:21 pm

    Set up an experiment. Here's a start:

    For each cable:

    * record a large number of trials of a well-known signal (sine, pulse, etc.).

    * bring the samples into a wave editor, phase align the signals, and come up with a measure of deviation for the cable. (subtract, then root mean squared, maybe?)

    Once you do all of the measurements, control for the audio hardware, and apply some knowledge of statistics, you'll have an idea about whether there's a measurable difference between your cables.

    Since you're controlling for your audio hardware (instead of controlling for "expensive equipment") it is context-sensitive to your equipment... which is ultimately what matters.

    Reply

  • stephoswalk

    stephoswalk

    March 10, 2015, 7:18 pm

    I don't know what his motives were or if he even realized what he did to me. My husband scared the piss out of him literally so I'm sure he knew after the fact. It's uncomfortable for me to try and look at it from his perspective, for obvious reasons.

    My religious upbringing definitely had a huge impact on my life. Jehovah's Witnesses are a very insular group so I've always had difficulty with social interactions. After I was raped it was really easy to isolate myself because that feeling was something I was already used to. They pretend to be loving and welcoming at first but, once you're in, you realize it's all gossip and judgment. I could never be a good enough Witness for them, no matter how hard I tried. I think that is part of why I am so hard on myself sometimes.

    Reply

  • Tokenwhitemale

    Tokenwhitemale

    March 11, 2015, 3:14 am

    You're mistaking 'cultural relativism' for 'ethical relativism'. No one denies that different culture have different moral beliefs and practices. It would be crazy to do so.

    It's also seems equally crazy to jump from, different people have "different moral beliefs and practices" to "There are no objective moral truths." That's obviously false.

    Try applying your standard for truth to mathematics. Not everyone believes that you can multiply infinities. It seems completely reasonable to me to believe that we can, but it might seem completely insane to someone else to think that we can. They would be wrong, of course, due to their failure to understand the relevant aspects of reality; namely mathematics and infinity. But by your standard, we'd both be right, which is incoherent.

    Reply

  • Blackdragonproject

    Blackdragonproject

    March 10, 2015, 8:27 pm

    I have thought about this a lot. I am not a vegetarian because we as humans evolved to eat meat. If you can handle not eating meat go nuts. I suffer from anemia and feel like shit very quickly no matter what i try to use as a substitute.

    This being said you have to remember that you are fucking with literally millions of years of evolution by taking an option that, for me living in Canada, has only bee available for what, 60 years? Before that we lived on nice fresh vegetable in the summer and canned beans and meat in the winter.

    Millions of years of evolution is far more a stable bet than believing at all in out feeble "luxury" state we have now. It shocks me to see the correlation between vegetarian/ vegans and people who believe in global warming/peak oil. What are you going to do when we can just go buy exotic fruits and vegetables? Just switch back? You will be so sick and if you are a second generation vegetarian you probably will never digest meat. So in the long term being a vegetarian could mean bubye bloodline for so many reasons.

    If there is ever a food crisis like i have to expect their will be, you cant expect those who can eat meat to give up a balanced diet because there are not enough vegetables to go around. We evolved to eat meat and the philosophy lies in dealing with that fact. That is what works and has kept us going since the beginning.

    Eating meet sucks, i know, i do feel bad for the animals. I see it more as a coming of age matter like shooting lassie, because it is what we are and we cant change this based on a selfish mindset of we need to not feel bad about anything we do and take the higher path just because we are human and have choice. Sometimes we don't.

    Reply

  • allisonivy

    allisonivy

    March 10, 2015, 11:08 pm

    I agree, maybe the sex obsession thing is making you come across as too intense. My best friend is exactly the same way, and I feel bad for her poor boyfriend who never gets a break from it. She feels like he's not into her if he turns down her advances, but he's explained that he just doesn't have the same appetite as her. Make sure that you're sensitive to what your partner wants and don't take it personally if they aren't exactly like you. If you really like the person, you might have to restrain yourself and not reveal everything right away. Men always say that they love the chase, being a tease seems mean, but it's a big turn on.

    Reply

  • Itkovan

    Itkovan

    March 10, 2015, 2:25 pm

    *"they looked over the logs for every $100 bill that they handed out, and the bill's serial number that you had was not in their logs. In fact, there's no record of it whatsoever."*

    If this is true that's all the evidence you need. They will have recorded the serial numbers of 16 $100 bills, not 17. Either way the bank manager fucked himself with this statement - if he does have the records it proves you right, and if he doesn't then he lied to a cop and cannot be trusted - this should be enough to sway any neutral third party.

    Reply

  • Peterabit456

    Peterabit456

    March 11, 2015, 7:50 am

    I'm not a big fan of brain science. It's not my field. But I have this to say" As a general rule, science can be well done, and still be wrong, and still contribute greatly to overall advances in science. It is often better to stir up a field, and get people to reexamine their assumptions, and maybe prove or disprove them, than to let a field become complacent.

    Let's look at the Alvarez incident, the dinosaur-killer asteroid at the K-T boundary. The theory turned out to be correct, but just as important, it shook Paleontology out of its rut. Paleontology had been a matter of looking at fossils, and dating them by looking at other fossils, sedimentary formations, and Carbon 14 or Potassium-Argon dating. That was it, for about 40 years.

    After the Alvarezes published their theory, paleontologists were forced to look at all sorts of evidence they had been ignoring for the past 30 or 40 years: other methods of dating, isotope ratios, astronomical data, and genetic data, have all revolutionized the field.

    Reply

  • newgrlontheblck

    newgrlontheblck

    March 10, 2015, 5:07 pm

    This exact thing happened to me 3 years ago. He had just gotten out of a very intense, long relationship with a girl who had cheated on him 3 times before he finally "left her for good." Our short relationship was amazing, we could talk all night and day and never run out of things to talk about, the chemistry was there, and it wasn't intimate until about 3 weeks into all of this. Then he says one day he needs to just be alone for a few days, to think, and write his music (douche). Then he never calls for about a week, so I call him. Then he invites me over to talk and says he needs more time, blah blah blah....long story short (well too late for that haha) he says he's just not attracted to me in "that way" and acts as if he never was, and as if nothing is wrong. I'm devastated of course, and I found out a month later he's back with the cheating ex gf. MOVE ON WITH YOUR LIFE. HE ISN'T WORTH YOUR WORRYING.

    A few months later I met my current boyfriend and I am so thankful I didn't spend time worrying about the previous douchebag, because we are extremely happy and he never ever had to have time to himself to think about anything. There were no games, no mystery...it's called an adult relationship.

    Reply

  • Radar_Monkey

    Radar_Monkey

    March 11, 2015, 6:25 am

    I apply a 6 inch barrier away from the house and 6 inches up the wall. The same applies to doors and windows, but I do them twice. I use very little inside even though I only use food safe inside the house.

    With wasp and ant nests I do go overboard. The advantage with spray cans is that that they make a very fine flammable mist that burn wasp wings as they try to fly out.

    Edit: I hate wasps, but I could care less about everything else. I just hate to wake up at 2AM and jump for my handgun when my girlfriend sees a spider in the house.

    Reply

  • vikingv

    vikingv

    March 10, 2015, 8:14 am

    Glenn Beck will not go away. He has too many actual nut-case supporters for that. It is best to expose him continuously as the leader of the nut-cases.

    We need to keep hammering on the idiot and keep the pressure on. This is the lunatic fringe who are spewing lies and fantasies. There is no better way to marginalize the crazies than to stick the label of crazies on them.

    To most Americans it would be an embarrassment to acknowledge an association with Glenn Beck. That means a lot of Republicans and Independents will become disenchanted with the Republican Party for putting up with the craziness of the Right. This is GOOD.

    Reply

  • Fimbulfamb

    Fimbulfamb

    March 10, 2015, 4:10 pm

    Would "the capability of introspection [communicating what's evoking one's responses] and empathy [anticipating another person's responses based on recognition of their state of mind]" do? I realize this is all wishy-washy, but in a way that lends credence to the argument that intelligence is not as close to being programmable in any way resembling that of *Deep Blue* or chatterbots. It's not really a concrete core, easily describable by simple analogies.

    But as for my neuronal puddle on the circuit board, my thinking was that if we have a machine that is for all intents and purposes comparable to an immobile human, which is perhaps a few years old and capable of speech (having learned it, *nota bene*), why shouldn't it get the same rights as a human being? (Same goes for any sort of apparatus capable of these things. Neuronal puddles are, to me, strangely fascinating, for whatever reason.)

    Reply

  • seeya

    seeya

    March 10, 2015, 4:45 pm

    > suppose you purchase a house or a piece of land, and, sadly, its value falls. Or you invest in stocks and, as in the 1990s, the market soars, showering on you a pile of totally new wealth. In such cases, wealth is not merely transferred but actually created or destroyed.

    There's some good stuff in the article, but this part sounds like some of the crappiest excuse for economics I've come across. That isn't wealth creation at all - wealth creation is the actual building of new homes or production of goods.

    Imagine if an earthquake destoryed 80% of the homes in your area. Now all of a sudden, the demand for housing is huge. You happen to have one of the few homes left standing, so now everyone wants to buy your house off your hands. The price offered for your house suddenly skyrockets. If we are to believe that part of the article, wealth has been "created"? What crap - the truth is that 80% of the housing wealth was just destroyed - rising prices does not mean wealth creation any more than inflation means wealth creation.

    Reply

  • Takuun

    Takuun

    March 10, 2015, 4:15 pm

    Pixies - All

    Modest Mouse - All

    Radiohead - In Rainbows (I skip Subterranean Homesick Alien on OK Computer and Kid A towards the end just doesn't do it for me)

    Pink Floyd - Animals

    Neutral Milk Hotel - In the Aeroplane Over the Sea

    The Cure - Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Kiss Me

    Depeche Mode - Violator

    At the Drive-In - Relationship of Command

    The Rural Alberta Advantage - Hometowns

    Sunny Day Real Estate - Diary

    Weezer - Pinkerton and Blue

    Yep. :)

    Reply

  • lambardar

    lambardar

    March 10, 2015, 2:33 pm

    wow..

    my accountant once withdrew some cash from a local bank and he got a couple of fake AED 500 bills (~ $137).

    comes to the office and puts the cash in the safe box. Next day he goes to clear an invoice with a local retailer and finds out that the bills are fake.

    so he goes back to the bank and the bank replaces the bills. this is like

    almost after 24 hours! He told me that once he realized they were fake, the bills seemed a lot bigger.

    It did surprise me though that bank never questioned. then again this is Dubai.

    PS. the serial log of every bill is BS. usually tellers do withdraws with bills they just received.

    Reply

  • freeholmes

    freeholmes

    March 11, 2015, 4:37 am

    When we moved into our apartment this year we were the only ones without power out of all the people, and most likely everybody, in the complex. It took over a week to get our power turned on because somehow the power company was never informed of new tenants moving in, even though its a fucking college campus so new tenant move in the same time every year, and the old tenants owed 2 months in back payments. Also The old tenants loved hock and fighting a bit too much, there were hockey magazines and court orders in their mail, because 3 of the doors had holes punched in them. Our couch was broken, the 2 coffee tables where broken, the balcony door and dinner table that was made of glass were both smashed so there was broken glass completely covering our apartment. So broken glass, jagged edges and debris all over the apartment, which after 7pm was pitch black because we had no electricity. Complete bullshit and our agency didn't care one bit we cleaned it all up ourselves and it took them 3 weeks to fix half the shit.

    Reply

  • warbiscuit

    warbiscuit

    March 11, 2015, 4:08 am

    Just an after-note: There's an idea of Mao's which I like. I disagree with most (no, I take that back, *all*) of his ideas, but there was a phrase of his which called for "permanent revolution", the idea that society can never be complacent, never accept that problem has been permanently solved, even if it is according to the tenets of what they know for sure to be the One True Way... because no One True Way contains merely a static set of rules, but must be adaptive to the environment... so everything should be questioned and rethought, all the time, even if the outcome of that debate is to leave things alone... it's the leaving things alone of an active observe, not of passive neglect. And right now, more than anything else, the people of the US as a whole have been neglected, because they themselves have been way to busy bickering, like an old married couple, about things which have long since been demoted in relevance.

    EDIT: It's the difference between continually shouting "America is Great!", and continually trying to make sure America is getting better, because that's what the other countries are doing, lest they disintegrate.

    Reply

  • Cyrius

    Cyrius

    March 11, 2015, 2:01 am

    >>They exit but they arent strong/efficient enough yet.

    >I think you mean they aren't useful enough. They are incredibly efficient, as evidenced by the fact that both Voyager vessels are into "interstellar space" at this point.

    Voyager 1 & 2 had no engines, ion or otherwise. They were equipped with thrusters for minor course corrections. I can't figure out where people get the idea that they're powered.

    Hayabusa used ion engines to rendezvous with an asteroid and leave again. It's expected back next year.

    Dawn is using ion engines to drive out to Vesta. After orbiting there a while, it will then drive to Ceres.

    Reply

  • the_nuclear_lobby

    the_nuclear_lobby

    March 11, 2015, 7:49 am

    Exactly - why do so many opposed to Israel not try and think objectively?

    Does anybody disagree with the following?

    * Israel will under no circumstances give up their nuclear weapons.

    * Under no circumstance would they allow themselves to be defeated militarily.

    * An economic collapse of Israel would create a _more_ unstable situation in the region, leading to unknown consequences.

    There are proliferation concerns (as you pointed out), the possibility of full-scale war, even potential nuclear attacks by Israel against other countries in the event of an economic collapse.

    How is that better than what we have now?

    You can argue US aid is wrong for whatever reason (and you could even be right), but to argue it should just stop without presenting any alternative that avoids unpredictable and potentially deadly consequences is extremely shortsighted.

    Reply

  • gerundronaut

    gerundronaut

    March 10, 2015, 4:53 pm

    I have here Dan Simmons's Hyperion, The Fall of Hyperion, and Endymion, all in mass-market paperback form. I bought TFoH while on vacation in the UK and the other two are in US mass-market form.

    The UK book, published by Gollancz (just noticed, heh), is about a quarter inch/3-4mm wider and just a smidge taller than the other two. The US books are published by Bantam/Spectra. The UK book is definitely superior, with the text not printed as close to either edge. The font is different, but I don't know which one is better.

    I would be less annoyed with mass-market books if they were more like yours, for sure.

    Reply

  • Tintagel

    Tintagel

    March 11, 2015, 8:49 am

    Mr. Maxwellhill here appears to know the score perfectly, however for some reason he has reversed the thought process.

    He is right - we simply do not understand the long-range behaviour of gravity. To this lack of understanding we give the name 'Dark Matter'. Think of it as an algebraic substitution for until we can prove exactly what causes the anomalies which lead us to believe that there is an un-explained factor here.

    Yet by far the worst thing to do would be to abandon "this enigmatic concept of invisible matter", adapt it perhaps, think of knew possibilities definitely. But it is ideas just so which make progress in the field.

    Reply

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