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American sociologist Rose Weitz once wrote that the most widespread cultural rule about hair is that women's hair must differ from men's hair.

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  • 6553321

    6553321

    March 11, 2015, 8:04 am

    Now finally I come to static allocation. Statically allocated variables are variables

    that go into .bss and .data sections or .rodata section if it is a constant. The first of

    these are global variables. But we all know global varaibles are bad and should avoid

    them when possible. So when you want something to be statically allocated but don't want

    to make global variables, C/C++ and many other languages give you a way out in which you

    have variables that behave like global variables to the hardware, but the language puts

    restrictions on you. In C/C++ these are acheived using the static keyword when declaring

    the variable. For example when you do:

    int* foo(){

    static int bar = 0xdead;

    ...

    return &bar

    }

    This declaration of bar will put bar in the data section and bar will exist for the

    duration of the program. The only advantage to making bar static is that now static

    can only be accessed from inside foo. So you don't have the same disadvantage of global

    variables that they can be modified from anywhere. Of course a pointer to bar may be

    returned and it will let you edit the value of bar, because unlike a local varaible bar

    is not destoyed on leaving the function. The other way to statically allocate a variable

    is if it is in a class and you declare it as static. Again same is before, it is a global

    variable except it's been prganized to be related to the class. If it is private then

    only class members can use it. Otherwise anyone can use it, but it's still better than

    the no restrictions that happen for a global variable. A static class member is not

    related to any instance of the class.

    There are a couple of other uses of static in C/C++ that are not related to static

    allocation. A global function may be declared static. Remember global variables are always

    statically allocated. When you declare a global varaible static, you tell the compiler

    not to let the global variable be visible outside this file. Another slight improvement

    over bare global variables. If a function (not a member of class) is declared static

    that funciton can only be caled within that file. If a method (part of a class) is

    declared static it will mean that the function is not associated with a particular

    instance of the class. As such it will not have any this pointer and cannot access any

    non-static variables.

    Reply

  • dionysian

    dionysian

    March 11, 2015, 2:49 am

    yes ritual is really good for the toddler ages, one thing can help with both the 4yr old and the older brother is to write up a brief weekly schedule together on a big piece of construction paper with pictures to represent activities, and try to think of activities together, post it on his bedroom wall and review it in the morning. just knowing what comes ahead can really calm a kid down and make them feel stable. especially when it comes to 'ending' a fun activity. "sorry, we have to go home from the park now, but remember our calendar says we will make play dough after your nap!" following through with the schedule builds trust as well, very important in confidence and independence for young kids.

    around 4 kids can learn to listen to a short "this is what we are gonna do" plan for a particular activity and it really helps them stay organized with helping you with the task, and they feel like theres a beginning and an end, keeps them on track since they can be very short attention span and low patience at that age!

    Reply

  • Phibbsy

    Phibbsy

    March 10, 2015, 1:30 pm

    They have never had a very centralized government. The army is probably the first national organization the Afghans have ever seen. I think it's very positive that it is the most trusted by poll. The basic things one needs for a successful army require a literate bureaucracy to support it, however. Right now NATO and the US military is providing the infrastructure for pay, food, shelter and communication with family. A good military is all about training and self-improvement.

    I dug deeper. Right now the literacy goal is that soldiers can write their name and weapon serial number by the end of the ten-week basic training.

    Reply

  • lrpiccolo

    lrpiccolo

    March 11, 2015, 7:30 am

    Same thing happened to me once. I got a $100 bill from BofA which turned out to be bogus, and when I called them to ask how to exchange it for a real one, they said that I should turn it in to them so they could destroy it. Yeah, and without giving me a new one. WTF!!?

    A few days later, I tucked my hair into a baseball cap, put on sunglasses, and went into an entirely different bank in another part of town with that $100 and two $50s, then asked to exchange them all for $20 bills. The cashier gave me ten twenty dollar bills, and I ran out of there without looking back. I know I just passed the buck (literally) but I was only about 20 at the time, and just couldn't afford to have that much cash just vanish.

    I'd be suspicious that they really do track all the serial numbers of each $100 bill. That sounds like a bunch of bogus ass-covering to me, unless there's a bank employee out there than can say otherwise.

    Reply

  • xerxes923

    xerxes923

    March 10, 2015, 4:01 pm

    The point is that trans people can be straight or gay, gender doesn't imply sexuality and sexuality doesn't imply gender. So clarifying that she is straight or 'still likes men' when it was never part of the discussion in the first place makes it seem like you thought that sexuality was related to gender orientation, and elburto wanted to make sure you knew it wasn't.

    Trans people are men and women. Saying 'we elected a woman' to represent them doesn't in any way imply that that person isn't trans. Cis-gendered is the adjective to use if you want to say someone isn't trans.

    > There are no trans- people at my uni so we elected a cis-woman to speak for them...

    FTFY

    Finally, not all trans people change their sex. The whole concept behind trans is that one's body doesn't dictate their gender. A person with a penis can be a trans-woman, cause gender and trans-ness is about your mind. So saying she's never undergone the sex-change operation doesn't mean she isn't trans.

    Reply

  • rednecktash

    rednecktash

    March 10, 2015, 10:43 am

    You're just jealous that Glenn Beck gets supporters and you don't. Want to know why that is? It's beacuse every opinion you create is just a revival of something you've read some other liberal read and said"aaah"..

    There's nothing original or at all interesting about what you say. Glenn Beck brings new light on situations and problems we have in America that isn't polluted by liberal left-wing media such as MSNBC or CNN. IF you want to ignore the truth that's fine, but I highly doubt it'll accomplish anything because some people want to know what's REALLY going on in the world, not what some lobbyist whose writing the scripts on CNN wants u to think.

    Reply

  • nextofpumpkin

    nextofpumpkin

    March 11, 2015, 7:53 am

    I'm assuming you're talking about a degree from an academic institution.

    The difference between computer science and computer engineering can be either very small or very large depending on the institution.

    At some places, Computer Science is closer to math and logic theory than anything. You're going to be doing enough mandatory programming to learn about the proofs and mechanisms, and the rest is up to you. Usually you can do lots of programming (databases, web programming, etc) if you choose to. If you do any corporate work after a CS curriculum, it's definitely going to be almost purely software-related.

    Computer Engineering can swing any number of ways depending on the institution and your choice of focus. Generally there's a lot more hardware, but I know many CEs who are going to work at purely software shops, and not using most of their lower-level knowledge on a day-to-day basis. Others are closer to EE than CS, and are going to be doing logic design and hardware verification.

    If you're unsure about low-level or high-level, CE is the way to go. You can later focus in higher-level courses on whatever half suits you best. If you're sure about high-level and don't want to have anything to do with the low level, CS is the obvious choice. If you want to stay high level but want to learn a lot about the low level just because it's interesting or you feel it will be useful, CE may be the best choice. If you really enjoy staying closer to the hardware but want to dabble in programming, CE is also the best choice.

    Again, it all depends on your institution and how much flexibility you have in course selection.

    Reply

  • zahlman

    zahlman

    March 11, 2015, 5:02 am

    I mean that the treasury is the treasury. The Government does not and should not take every single input stream it receives and put it in a separate pile, and only allow funds for a given thing to be withdrawn from a specific pile. Even if that made sense, at the end of the day they have to borrow money to cover any piles that are short, pile together an excess from piles that had a surplus, put that remaining pile towards outstanding debt to other countries... in the end, it's the same thing.

    This "government borrowing from itself" concept that you are describing is a complete red herring. It makes about as much sense as saying that you are borrowing from yourself every time you purchase something - which is to say, no sense at all.

    Reply

  • vikingv

    vikingv

    March 10, 2015, 5:43 pm

    Bogus article written comparing an economic indicator before the market crash with today's recession numbers. Of course railroad loadings are down from a year ago.

    We all know that GDP shrank, purchasing shrank and goods produced shrank since a year ago. WTF is this author trying to do? The author is trying to create a misleading story that the economy is worsening when in fact, the economy has already crashed.

    It is old news. We know we are in a recession. The author is fucking with you and dishonest in that he is trying to make everyone afraid as if something new is happening to worsen the economy. This author is a fucking scumbag Republican supporter probably. Want to place bets on it?

    Reply

  • buu700

    buu700

    March 11, 2015, 7:54 am

    It's to prevent karma whoring. In a subreddit like relationship_advice, we don't want to get spammed by a bunch of links from people who just want karma. Submissions really are supposed to be limited to people seeking advice, so if you want to submit an external source, we have to be sure that you're doing it because you believe that it really is meaningful advice, not because you want karma. In short, it's the principle behind the rule that I'm defending here, not that I think this is somehow more convenient in this one case.

    Reply

  • numb3rb0y

    numb3rb0y

    March 10, 2015, 9:09 am

    Wikipedia just says she placed them both together at the scene. I'm not arguing that they didn't have sex, just that we don't have anything other than the victim's testimony to indicate that it was non-consensual outside the scope of her being a minor, and victim testimony alone is not infallible proof of wrongdoing. Yes, he's a paedophile and a disgusting, vile individual, but you can't just assume a bad person is guilty of things because they're a bad person. We have standards of evidence for a reason.

    Reply

  • plinky4

    plinky4

    March 10, 2015, 8:44 pm

    New gamers would just get murdered by the level of platforming skill required to progress in this game. I know what you're getting at - my opinion is that this game is not accessible to new gamers, though your deduction might make sense.

    Then again, my experience with non-gamers playing games is that they seem to approach games by throwing all practicality and common sense out of the window. Basically, I feel like I am trying to teach a retarded kid how to do stuff.

    No, *don't* throw a propane tank at me and then shoot it.

    Look, if somebody is being strangled right next to you screaming *help help help*, you should probably get them out of it.

    No, you have to hold the button to start the generator. No - *hold* the button. HOLD THE FUCKING BUTTON! Why the fuck do you keep pressing it. Do you see the bar - fuck it, I'll do it.

    Reply

  • recreational

    recreational

    March 10, 2015, 6:37 am

    Example; Hypoglycemia. Part of the reason that diabetes is such a serious disease is that your brain runs on sugar. When your body stops being able to metabolize sugar, the first thing that happens is /you turn into a moron/. No joke. Doesn't matter how smart you were to start with. You behave irrationally and self-destructively. You can't will your way out of it. Diabetic people often think they can but that's because the diabetes makes them stupid and then they end up going into shock and dying. With modern medicine, this disease is easy to monitor except that it convinces people to skip meals or not take their medicine. It is literally a stupid disease caused by a chemical change in your brain.

    Reply

  • cartooncorpse

    cartooncorpse

    March 10, 2015, 9:08 am

    parasites should 'man up'. My credo is justice. The reality here is that this is a land of LIMITED resources.

    Apparently you would see the entire human species perish because they 'have' to carry an ever growing burden of useless miscreants who can't survive on their own. That's the ultimate result, you SHOULD know that.

    And all the fairytales and poetry in the world is NOT going to change that fact.

    it's not a sad world, it's a brutal one. and if you don't respect nature's plan, nature is going to take you out sooner or later.

    Reply

  • warbiscuit

    warbiscuit

    March 10, 2015, 11:11 am

    I'm quite willing to accept people strongly disagreeing with my position. That's the way a democracy has to work, with all the various positions being argued. If there are two or more widely-held and opposing philosophies about the nation's course, there's naturally going to be, um... _ardent_ debate.

    What I don't accept is the all the moral relativism and false parity that's all the rage these days... the idea that there _is_ no single answer to the problems we face, that the best and only acceptable thing to do is sit around bickering with each other like on tv, and that any one who wants dialogue to have some more productive goal is merely being foolish.

    For a given situation, it may be my opinion that's correct, or it may be someone else's. I have yet to run across _anyone_ who's opinion was _always_ right. But to mock the idea that someone _could_ be right (such as AttackOfLogic's ad-hominem trolling) is to give up entirely on the process of debate itself.

    And that's the only thing I was asserting we as citizens have a responsibility to do: to enter into the political debate with the goal of constructively acheiving results, to give the nation directive and a better chance of survival going forward, until we are dead and it's someone else's job. Now, if you think _that_ is merely my opinion, my sense of responsibility, then you are gravely mistaken, because that is the unquestioned point of a democracy, as has been defined since the greek city-states like Athens and Sparta: the citizens are the originators of all power, and the government merely exists as the instrument to serve their wishes.

    If you disagree with that, then I only see two choices: giving up your duty as a citizen, and let the instrument direct itself; or give up the instrument and form a better one. The first is letting the government be in control, and that only leads to an oligarchy; the second is giving up your citizenship. If you reject those two choices, then you have to accept your duty to participate.

    And if you accept your duty to participate, you can't go into the debate with the goal of score points off those who disagree with you, merely for the sake of building up your ego... our duty is not to look like we're doing something, running around arguing, but to actually *do something*, every day.

    [begin some opinion]

    And that's where I start to disagree with some people. There's the philosophy that you shouldn't question the president, which I heard many Republicans (both in person and on television) espousing throughout the Iraq war. And I really don't understand how they arrive there, because these are typically rather individualistic type people, who nevertheless believe that the President is somehow "right" by default, especially during wartime. He's not, and I refuse to cede any power to him as such: he may be the CEO, but we are the stockholders. Personally, I thought the Iraq war was a mistake, that we dropped the ball on the Afghan war, which I supported since the Taliban started trying to attack US assets, back during Bush '41. Not sure which "two wars" you referenced.

    (And don't come back with some false-parity about Democrats not questioning Obama... I've seen very few, on tv or in person, who were happy with his performance in office).

    I don't think anyone would disagree that our politicians need to feel much more afraid of losing our approval, not just the disproportionately loud fringes, but the much quieter pragmatists: the people who care less about the name of the ideology which is being used, and more about the results it achieves. Anytime I see someone call for a "permanent republican majority" or a "final default of the forces of statis" (the far-left equivalent), I have to doubt their seriousness... any group of people, however small or large, has to be able to adapt to changes in their environment, and their internal makeup. What has worked in the past may not work now, or it may be working well enough that we can't afford to experiment with change right now.

    And that's where the original lower-case "conservative" and "progressive" ideas came from... that generally, all political decisions could be broken down into two camps, keeping the current way of doing things, or trying something new. Within the last 50 years (probably because of the advent of the field of propaganda), we locked in what the current state of things was, and what the new state of things should be.

    These became the "Conversative" view and the "Liberal" view, and we've held to these for so long that even when history and environment inevitably changed, the tenets of the ideologies no longer match the categorical names they were derived from: The current Conservative platform is now one of radical change: undo financial regulations that 90 years were put in place to protect the status-quo, rollback government programs whose original purpose was to preserve the current way of life. Conversely, the current Liberal platform is practically a reaction to that: do everything possible to hold fast to the changes acheived since "liberal" became "Liberal", in the face of the Conversative urge to disrupt the status quo and remake society.

    And unfortunately, everyone has become so stuck in this reactionary cycle that everyone is simply becoming more extreme, more polarized, making it even harder for _anyone_ to do anything. And while that may at times be briefly desirable, this is not one of those times, with the economic and foreign threats we are currently facing.

    Reply

  • otterplay

    otterplay

    March 11, 2015, 5:54 am

    No... if you read what I said carefully, you'll see that it's a general problem I'm talking about, which is indeed specific to how the language is designed. Of course, it's only one con, in the midst of many pros when it comes to using tcl/tk. And, indeed, it's a very good thing that tcl/tk keeps up with the times. And I don't see how that would be possible without building on to it in the way that they have. Some projects, like Alan Kay's "Squeak," become walled gardens that just don't utilise the advancements that become available.

    And certainly, it's really much nicer in my estimation to code in tcl/tk than it would be to do projects in C. I wouldn't want to have a lifestyle where I coded in C day after day and week after week. C is designed to make things easy for the computer, rather than easy for the human who writes the code. I have been looking to the horizon, and have been very curious about lisp and smalltalk, too... but each additional language requires a big investment of time to learn.

    Reply

  • night_owl

    night_owl

    March 10, 2015, 11:55 am

    Apparently, I use Twitter differently than most people. I find it is a very useful to passively get news and updates from bands and news sources.

    When one of my favorite bands posts new tour dates, or maybe a new album release, i get a twitter update. When my favorite team has an injury update or a trade i get a twitter update. Saves me the trouble of scouring news sites, etc. for info. Everyone is talking about how narcissistic it is but i just don't get it. No one says you have post what you had for lunch.

    Reply

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