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Giester : The crystal structure of faustite and its copper analogue turquoise. 4 hours ago Lutron showed me its solution for this problem at CES last January, and the lighting manufacturer is finally preparing to ship its Lutron Aurora smart bulb dimmer.

is a free personal email service from Microsoft that doesn't scan. Attention également à ne pas confondre une dysfonction érectile (comme une érection molle ou le fait de débander pendant lacte) avec les troubles de léjaculation comme.

Categories: Erectile Dysfunction | viagra over the counter

Comments

  • Xaphiosis

    Xaphiosis

    March 11, 2015, 5:16 am

    If people are well-disciplined, not that often. It does affect naming though, e.g. SDL_ and so on. SDL, OpenGL, and a lot of other libraries will have functions names that collide, but they add a prefix to all exposed functions.

    With namespaces, you can `open` them (in SML you can do that inside a `local ... in ... end` block). I guess C-like prefixing to dance around collisions does have some advantages, but to me personally, the ability to contain names and spill them from one container to another is something I find very useful. I really like C, but the lack of any kind of module or name scoping system beyond prefixes and `static` annoys me. Maybe it's just me :)

    Reply

  • Whatever4ever

    Whatever4ever

    March 10, 2015, 11:13 am

    I started my period in a hotel bed, whilst I was asleep. Woke up and blearily felt around at the dampness between my legs -- pulled a red-soaked hand up and immediately released what had happened. After I finished showering and such, I pulled the sheets back to examine the mess. The stain was about 7-inches across and had soaked through to the plastic mattress protector.

    I was so embarrassed. I was just 15 years old at the time. I left the maid all the money I had on me as a tip, like $8.63 or something random like that. Didn't tell my aunt and uncle, either.

    Reply

  • biggerx

    biggerx

    March 10, 2015, 6:12 am

    Bullshit. I'm a current 1st gen iPhone owner & I love it. It's made out of aluminum & glass. It's sturdy & solid. I'll probably keep it for years. Aluminum mac products are the only ones that hold up (thank tfsm that they went back to aluminum in their new Macbooks).

    Now here is where Apple went bad. Plastic. White or black it's really shitty plastic. I had my first gen Mackbook (Core Duo not Core 2 Duo) replaced twice due to hairline fractures in the plastic. My roommates second gen Macbook had the exact same problem. New plastic iPhones feel cheap.

    It seems they have wised up, but they still sell a white Macbook & the iPhone in plastic & it's cheap. What sdlvx is very true.

    I also owned a late 2007 Macpro & I sold it about a year later for the same price that I bought it for (people are stupid) and proceeded to build another quad core that was twice as powerful for 400$ less. After this iPhone I will never own another Apple product.

    Best Apple product I have ever owned was a Macintosh Classic II.

    *Edit typo.

    Reply

  • recreational

    recreational

    March 11, 2015, 2:31 am

    Dude. You have no idea what you're talking about. No medical professional in the wide fucking world would agree with what you just said. Even the NFL-paid lawyers didn't try to argue that, they just tried to absolve themselves of the cause.

    Your brain is a muscle that controls your behavior. Not everyone who acts fucked up has a messed up brain, but EVERYONE with a messed up brain will act fucked up. It's not a matter of fucking willpower or whatever retardation you're thinking; if your brain stops working in various places you'll go crazy or camotose or autistic. That's why disorders like diabetes, alzheimers, etc. exist. Because chemical and physical changes to the state of your brain can affect your behavior beyond your control.

    Reply

  • avengingturnip

    avengingturnip

    March 10, 2015, 1:52 pm

    And further down the same page:

    >Various gun-control groups, such as Handgun Control Incorporated and the Violence Policy Center have claimed that the Branch Davidans had used .50 caliber rifles and that therefore these types of firearms should be banned. Nevertheless, the evidence of this is unclear; the US Treasury Department, in a memorandum to the press dated July 13, 1995 titled "Weapons Possessed by the Branch Davidians", provided an inventory of all the firearms and firearm-related items that were recovered from the Branch Davidian's compound, which claims no .50 caliber rifles or machine guns were recovered, only 4 magazines, 3 magazine springs and belt links for .50 caliber weapons were listed.

    Reply

  • brotogeris1

    brotogeris1

    March 10, 2015, 8:19 pm

    Teach the little man character. Teach him fairness, loyalty, integrity. Do this in the context of playing games and having fun. Teach him perseverance--maybe the most important quality he'll need as an adult. Do a project that will take a while to finish, like a puzzle. You can have many great conversations while doing it. And he'll learn perseverance. Teach him to cook. It'll be miraculous to him, and, it'll teach creativity, ingenuity and science. Take him into different neighborhoods and show him how different people live. Bring him to restaurants where he will eat foods from all over the world. Bring him to the firehouse to meet the firemen. Take him to the dog shelter and show him what happens hen there are too many dogs. Show him cause and effect. Show him consequences. Teach him tolerance. Teach him to have a kind heart.

    Reply

  • staleprin

    staleprin

    March 11, 2015, 9:38 am

    Thanks, I appreciate your congrats.

    I never once considered surgery for weight loss. The reason for this is that although my health was at great risk, I had no doubt that I could lose the weight naturally. And truth be told, this weight loss was the first real attempt I had made to do so, so there was never an opportunity to consider alternative methods of weight loss.

    I am considering surgery to remove excess skin, however, as you can read above. Surgery will be my last resort and after a long time considering it. I am someone who doesn't like to interfere with my body's natural way of being so to do something so intrusive like surgery will be a big thing for me.

    Reply

  • Freeky

    Freeky

    March 10, 2015, 11:21 pm

    Smaller paperbacks are better for reading, especially in one of my favourite places to read; the bath, where oversized ones are considerably more awkward to hold (and yes, same with big hardbacks). It also looks silly and more importantly wastes space on the shelf having a bunch of small paperbacks and a handful of random ones twice the size. Smaller books are also way easier to carry around when travelling. It's like I'm being punished for not waiting to buy the mass market reprint that *might* arrive next year.

    So yes, I'm really whining about it on Reddit. *Waaa*.

    Reply

  • JStarx

    JStarx

    March 11, 2015, 3:49 am

    Every theory has its narwhals, the best theory has always been the theory that has the fewest.

    If you were to create a new equation for the attractive force of gravity that perfectly explains the observed rotational speeds of galaxies you would still presumably have an equation that predicts that if there is no matter then there is no gravitational attraction. So your theory would not explain gravitational lensing in areas where there's no observed gravity. The evidence for dark matter is not solely based on the strength of the gravitational force, but also sometimes on it's mere presence.

    Now I'm not saying that it's not possible to come up with such a theory. Maybe it is and maybe we'll find that the dark matter theory was a wrong turn. But that's not what's been done here; it's not what's described in this article. Maybe if they keep working on their theory they will eventually do that. And when such a time comes as their theory has fewer narwhals it will be considered the better theory. But until then it's not dogmatic to think that dark matter of some sort is a plausible solution to the problem.

    No physicist NEEDS dark matter. But dark matter works, so until something else works better...

    Reply

  • joinertek

    joinertek

    March 10, 2015, 9:01 pm

    I'm on disability, and I had five surgeries over the course of two years. I got bills from everybody. Medicare paid what it paid, and I got bills from everybody for the remainder. I've paid the doctors off, still paying the two hospitals $50 and $65 every month, with about $1400 total left to pay. All this on a disability income. Everyone has been very nice about it and they were happy to work out a payment plan.

    I've never heard of anyone experiencing what you experienced. If a hospital never sent you a bill and turned you straight over to a collection agency without ever giving you a chance to pay your bill, you have cause for legal action.

    Reply

  • notfancy

    notfancy

    March 10, 2015, 6:35 pm

    I think it's a bit more complicated than that: there are multiple providers for PC-class hardware, so from an acquisitions point of view it makes more sense to choose a commodity than a specialized product, if the option exists. An enlightened enough IT department could provide a choice between Windows and Macs to each staffer, but it is difficult to argue that such a choice can be afforded without incurring in costs not offset by the value Macintoshes offer.

    In short, to me it's a clear cost-benefit-supported decision.

    Reply

  • dionysian

    dionysian

    March 11, 2015, 5:48 am

    Absolutely! And one other thing young kids like is when the adult pretends to be incompetent. It gets the kids to participate more like, noooo THIS is how you do it! or "nooo let me show you" and they feel all awesome for having been a little smurrter than the adult, plus it teaches critical thinking.

    Just little things like "oh hummm i think this bird is like a cat, theyre the same yeah! what do you think, do they look the same? ohh what? they arent the same? no way ohh maybe youre right! why do you think that?" Or pretending that you cant fit a piece of a puzzle in the spot (the kid will naturally take it and do it themselves to 'show' you, its pretty hilarious to watch) or just doing bizarrely wrong things like trying to drink out of a soda without opening the bottle first and acting all puzzled why it wont come out, to encourage the kid to think upon their own knowledge and logic and correct you.

    Reply

  • handlit33

    handlit33

    March 11, 2015, 9:35 am

    This is my husband's account, but I'll speak for him.. even though he wasn't technically a bachelor at the time.

    We were engaged, and he was up late playing a poker tournament. I had already gone to bed and he had to pee really bad but couldn't risk missing a hand so he grabbed a nearby empty water bottle and took a piss in it.

    The next morning I woke up and went to do the dishes. I blindly reached under the sink to grab the dishwashing detergent and pulled out a water bottle with yellow liquid. You guessed it, he took a piss in a water bottle and put it under the sink. It's a good thing I looked before pouring it in the dishwasher.

    Reply

  • MistahGustitues

    MistahGustitues

    March 10, 2015, 6:37 am

    I asked for your thoughts on what I said, and all you responded with was the same tired montra of "Insurance companies are bad."

    I don't think you even read my last post.

    And, "News flash"? I'm trying to have a discussion with you. Please don't insult my by writing like a prick.

    I went into your posts, and you spend a lot of time on reddit. A lot of the things you say are dickish, and I don't think I would like you.

    I'm just going to assume this conversation isn't going anywhere.

    Reply

  • nixonrichard

    nixonrichard

    March 10, 2015, 2:38 pm

    No, things happen. People get speeding tickets and nothing appears in the mail. People sign up for cable TV and their bill never arrives. The proper way to handle your finances is not to ignore something until it catches up with you. Things happen. Mistakes are made. Sometimes addresses get mixed up and messages don't get delivered. That doesn't make your responsibility go away.

    You visited a hospital. You had to have known you owed the hospital money. If you don't contact the hospital, they will contact you . . . always. Through a collections agency if necessary. It's not profitable to go through collections. They charge a lot. It's the LEAST preferred method for a hospital.

    I've seen SO many young people go down this road, and it can take years to get back off it. For your own good, don't ignore responsibilities and bills. Don't wait for people to find you. Follow up. Keep track of your finances, your bills, and your credit. Even if you put a payment in the mail, don't assume it made it okay. Check your bank records. It's easy now that everything is online.

    If you want to blame the country and the government and whoever for not providing something for you, that's fine, but financial responsibility goes well beyond paying your hospital bill.

    If I were you, I'd pay of the hospital bill as soon as possible, and work my ass off to challenge the hit to my credit.

    Reply

  • forkbomber

    forkbomber

    March 11, 2015, 7:56 am

    If you have a working theoretical system that until now has succeeded in reliably predicting a wide variety of natural phenomenon, it would be unwise and counterproductive to simply discard the entire thing as soon as contradicting evidence is observed. Indeed, you want to try to start with the smallest refactoring that will allow it to consistently predict both the previously and newly observed behavior. It's only when the smaller attempts fail that you want to try to redesign larger and larger chunks of the system.

    In the case of unexpected gravitational phenomenon, Occam's razor would have us first assume that for one reason or another we've simply failed to observe the mass that's causing the behavior, especially if we can model the missing matter in away that would be consistent with existing theory. This article is the first strong evidence I've seen that contradicts the idea that excessive galactic rotational velocities are not simply due to unobserved matter, granted I'm not a physicist either.

    This reminds me of how the discovery that neutrinos had mass shook the foundations of the Standard Model of particle physics. For 30+ years, scientists have been resting their new theories and research on the shoulders of the self-consistent math of the Standard Model. Yet, over $100 million was spent to verify one little assumption that allowed the model to work: that neutrinos were massless. The results of those experiments will now require a theoretical overhaul.

    My point is that as with neutrino mass, scientists aren't blindly asserting dark matter's existence. As with all new scientific hypotheses, just as much energy is being spent trying to disprove it as trying to build new theories with it.

    Reply

  • artman

    artman

    March 10, 2015, 9:37 am

    Ah, college. I remember the douches down the other end of the hall who would play Phil Collins (this is the 80's) at 11 in the afternoon with the door open.

    I would return from class, pull out my LP of the Dead Kennedy's and blast that down the hall.

    Stereo wars. Good times.

    Thing is, we later became good buddies and we started a drinking game. Kamikaze Parties. We would sit subjects in a chair and administer upside down Kamikazes. Whomever passed a dozen of them they would get a hand painted Kamikaze bandanna to wear. It would be fun to see all these guys and gals dragging their ass down to the cafeteria on Sunday morning wearing those things.

    Good times. Don't let them pass you by.

    Reply

  • PublicStranger

    PublicStranger

    March 11, 2015, 7:11 am

    Flirting is good, if it's obvious enough. Or just straightforwardly saying you're interested or attracted, or that you would like to go out on a "date" (using that actual word or something that is similarly clear).

    I don't really know the ideal way to go about it. It's just best if everyone goes into it on the same page, however that's achieved.

    How do you prefer a girl to let you know she's attracted to you? (With my current boyfriend, I broke down and emailed him to tell him I had feelings for him; fortunately, he returned the feeling but had just been too shy to say anything, even though we'd been friends for 8 years. I suppose I could have gone about it a more romantic way, but I'm not a very romantic person.)

    Reply

  • marblelion

    marblelion

    March 10, 2015, 6:01 pm

    I am not offering the opinion to split hairs about the particular definition of words. If you or a lawyer wants to nitpick it, fine. Rape is any kind of sexual intercourse that happens without consent from all parties involved.

    If it is not sexual contact than it is not sexual assault. If someone touches your shoulder or grabs your arm, that is not the same as them trying to molest you.

    I don't think it is a gray area if you were drugged. Only a lawyer would try to argue that a drugged person technically gave consent. If it can be proven that drugs were used, than that should be used against the accused as evidence that they raped or assualted the victim and for the separate issue of giving a person drugs w/o their consent or knowledge.

    Yes, they are different crimes, but if you are accused or convicted of looking at CP, then you are labeled a sex offender and subject to the same penalties and restrictions a real sex offender has to deal with. It should not be that way.

    Someone who looks at pornography is not a potential danger to the public.

    Reply

  • coolmanmax2000

    coolmanmax2000

    March 11, 2015, 12:18 am

    I live in Chicago and I agree, after visiting a ton of cities in the US and abroad, that there aren't many places where people are just generally nicer than Chicago. However, I think that the games would have been a good thing for the city. Chicago is not isolated from the rest of the world, and the games would have been a great way for the US to show that it is not the crazy, foreign-hating, warmonger that many in the international community see us as. Even if the city didn't have all the necessary resources, the federal government would surely have helped out, because it looks good for the country. I believe that it would have served as an impetus to modernize our aging "L" system, and serve to revitalize part of the city that people are currently afraid to touch. I think all the people who are saying that it's wonderful that we won't have tens of thousands of additional toursists crowding our city are being really shortsighted, when you realize that those tourists would have been spending a ton of money in Chicago's stores and hotels and businesses. I also fault Chicago's bid committee, because I think we way underbid for the games. Part of the reasoning was that we already have a number of the facilities that the games would require, but I also think that in the recession, Chicago didn't want to be seen as wasteful. It doesn't really matter now, but I hope that some of the lingering hope or dreams of what could have been will be translated into some real changes now for the city.

    Reply

  • bigattack

    bigattack

    March 10, 2015, 3:07 pm

    CitiGroup did not "bilk" the government out of anything. THEY BOUGHT A HEDGE AGAINST ASSET LOSSES fair and square for $7B. And they DID NOT MAKE A PROFIT. If they had made a profit, then the government would have too. CitiGroup lost $7B (what they paid the government) plus $29B (10% of the losses). They just didn't lose as much as the government. They basically paid the government $7B to insure that their losses were capped. By the way, these assets may still be worth something, and if they are, then the government stands to actually make some money.

    Grayson is not even saying that they bilked the government for hundreds of billions of dollars. He knows what happened was legal and rational. Again, faced with the same deal, you would take it. Maybe the government should have let these banks fail. Maybe the government should have allowed the collapse of the financial system. But some set of people decided not to let that happen and this is one of the vehicles by which they chose to use. That's it.

    Reply

  • Fangsinmybeard

    Fangsinmybeard

    March 10, 2015, 4:38 pm

    That the second law of thermodynamics is violated constantly by the acceptance of the Dirac sea and that the universe is not a close system. Dark energy violates the second law, but some would say that the law of conservation of energy and that all things dissipate into the lowest state of thermal energy. So is the oldest scientific laws on the books might be way wrong? Remember Newton and the revolution of enlightenment laid down the laws, thinking that they got it right. There is such a thing as a perpetual motion machine, called an atom. If it stops, then it no longer exists as an atom, therefore it must maintain motion. We cannot reach absolute zero, unless we remove some energy that is not heat or thermal energy? We need to look very hard at the laws of thermodynamics!

    Reply

  • gerundronaut

    gerundronaut

    March 10, 2015, 7:41 am

    I wish I could find more books in the larger size paperback format, but I'm usually late to the party. Sometimes I get lucky at a used book store, but I would rather the money go directly to the publisher if possible.

    Sure, they bigger books are more of a pain to carry around, but the smaller mass-market printings are almost universally awful. They print the text so close to the binding that you practically have to damage the book just to read it. The larger size paperbacks (which I'm now learning are called trade paperbacks, thanks artman/neuromonkey) offer a better reading experience.

    Reply

  • skulgnome

    skulgnome

    March 10, 2015, 2:48 pm

    These aren't properly "embedded" devices anymore, though. The TiVo and so forth are appliances with megabytes of RAM and the Windows/CE systems are PDAs and smartphones with, again, megabytes of RAM.

    Think more like... you've got the humble elevator controller. 256 bytes of RAM, of which 64 bytes is reserved for the 8-bit processor's _stack_ (meaning you can only call up to 11 deep, as required by the standard) and another 64 bytes for the interrupt handler's stack. Of the 128 bytes left, all are allocated statically. Code is in a non-upgradeable PROM that's blown at the factory. Instead of an UART, you have a bitbanging assembly routine.

    Reply

  • DaPM

    DaPM

    March 10, 2015, 10:49 am

    >What I found most interesting was that even when you start people out with identical amounts of money and talent, the result is the same.

    Of course that luck matters when all players have equal abilities and resources.

    That is also irrelevant in real life, where people are definitely not equal in terms of ability, work ethic or initial wealth.

    >So basically, all economics boils down to a game of hot potato or musical chairs.

    Yeah, let's all draw overly broad unsupported conclusions :)

    Reply

  • haydn9

    haydn9

    March 11, 2015, 7:22 am

    Seriously, dude, JEHST - RETURN OF THE DRIFTER!!! You won't actually believe it until you hear it. I've listened to most of the artists here and they don't have a thing on Jehst.

    From the song - Liquid Diction-

    This simple liquid diction that I dote on/

    Is only a thimble full of fluid from the emotional ocean

    That I float on./

    Romantic notions I wrote on dead trees,/

    I retrieve the scrolls and breathe below the dead sea/

    From City of Industry-

    You can see me as cynical, trapped in my own gothic vision.

    Encapsulating chaos in this composition.

    Calculated like the lies of a politician

    Gripping the slingshot, I size up the opposition.

    I drop a match in the clouds and watch the flames rise

    Fire water falling from these grey skies

    Opening line from 'Die when you Die'-

    Every dialectic shapeshifts a makeshift shield of hatred

    My pen nib inches closer and closer;

    The ghosts in my dome stay closed in a coma.

    Crows overhead, twisted as the trail we tred.

    Most failed or fled, ended up jailed or dead.

    But never me

    Eyes in the back of my head, for any enemy

    Reply

  • marblelion

    marblelion

    March 10, 2015, 8:49 pm

    Based on what do we have this right? And regardless of if we have the "right", the question here is what "should" be the way. If things are going to change within a system. they should change for the better.

    So, what good is served by the public knowing all details of a trial such as names? Does this somehow help the victim? Does it rehabilitate the criminal?

    I agree that a government and its judicial system should be transparent, but that is possible without subjecting people to humiliation and retaliation.

    Reply

  • RDEB

    RDEB

    March 10, 2015, 7:55 pm

    I tend to agree with nixonrichard here. I think if you don't receive the bill, then you should be able to return to the hospital with your release papers and ask them to pull up the bill associated with it. A hospital is not going to just throw away documentation on a medical visit, and they are going to give you documentation as you leave. I think my question to you is, what did you do to follow up with the hospital to retrieve your bill after you did not receive it?

    Regarding your other statements that the medical system is broken, I do agree.

    Reply

  • ar0nic

    ar0nic

    March 11, 2015, 1:50 am

    while this does not effect me personally as hulu is NOT the end all to get streaming content, and is generally not the best when it comes to any specific show...But i do agree with drhatt that it could be a great opportunity for Comcast to merge streaming content with their service.

    this also doesn't effect me as i am one of a very small portion of the population that is Using Comcast in a market where they actually provide great customer service, great service, and great speeds. I consistently get 20-30mbit down, and 3.5mbit upstream also consistent, i have also gone over their "250gbit transfer cap" MULTIPLE times in the past year without any warning.

    I have never received a letter in the mail, and outrageous bill, bad CSR's. The ONLY place Comcast fails in my market is with their TECHNICAL SUPPORT and their TECHNICIANS if you can call them that.

    They outsource a lot of why i like to call "bitchwork" to sub contractors, and only use their technicians for other aspects of delivering their service. Getting my cable turned on with any Cable provider has always seemed to be a shitty experience cause of these reasons. So if people are wondering YES there are happy comcrap customers out there, i am one of them.

    I live in charleston SC and i pay 98 dollars a month for cable internet, basic analog cable, and their "upgraded plan internet plan" which im not even sure what it is as ive always had the same speeds in this location

    Reply

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