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  • dionysian

    dionysian

    March 10, 2015, 1:36 pm

    Just leave the TV off. Leave it unplugged even. Tell him it broke or something, or that it needs to be fixed, so he won't be like but im tired of doing this i wanna watch teevee. That might be a natural reaction if you guys have been watching a LOT of tv lately, the new activities and physical activity will be tiring and feel like so much more work and the challenge will be tough at first. But once you guys get into a solid routine of no tv watching, the activities will come naturally.

    If you guys need some down time, read books, lay on the floor on pillows and listen to music. TV trains the mind to be so passive, especially in youngsters. After watching tv too long, even educational TV, my daughter (2) will be very slow in answering questions, just kind of expecting them to be answered like they are on tv programmes, no thinking for herself, no interaction, just zoning, which means the brain is not working and will have a hard time jolting back into being more inquistive.

    AK40Heaven: the no tv thing will be good for YOU too, if you plan to go to uni and study, etc, your brain needs to stay sharp, and the mental exercise of learning college subjects wont feel as hard.

    Reply

  • andbruno

    andbruno

    March 11, 2015, 5:52 am

    From your own link:

    >However, a widely cited 1993 audit and independent research conducted by the daily newspaper The Toronto Star in 1999 **showed that these financial figures were largely bogus.**[1] When announcing these numbers, organizers had removed from their calculations $461 million in subsidies provided by federal, provincial and local governments used mainly for building the games venues. When these government investments were included in the balance sheets, **the Calgary Olympics were reported to have produced a sizeable financial loss.**

    It is highly recommended that you read links you submit.

    Reply

  • spamdefender

    spamdefender

    March 10, 2015, 5:10 pm

    LOL! Remember when he said we would attack Iran within a year... and then we did? Remember when he talked about a draft for the Iraq War back in 2003? Or when he claimed the Democrats would impeach Bush? Or when he claimed in 1983 that the dollar would collapse within the next few years?

    Seriously, are you guys delusional or do you just enjoy the cult? You treat this man as the second coming and ignore his faults. He is wrong far more often that he is right and his grand predictions NEVER come true (he has predicted a depression every single year since the 80's so don't even start with that as it's like a weatherman predicting rain for 4 weeks and then finally it does rain one day).

    Reply

  • DaPM

    DaPM

    March 11, 2015, 4:35 am

    FTA:

    >In 2009, roughly 47% of households, or 71 million, will not owe any federal income tax

    >When considering federal income taxes in combination with payroll taxes, the percent of households with a net liability of zero or less is estimated to be 24% this year

    Your original post:

    >And how many of the employed pay a "payroll tax"?

    Let's not change the topic, OK? I clearly mentioned the two percentages in the headline since I knew that somebody will bring the old "payroll taxes count too" line - and they DO.

    Whether they are used to their initial purpose or not is irrelevant - I was just pointing out that they are NOT paid by everybody.

    If anything, I agree that they are equivalent to the income tax, as money is fungible anyway.

    Reply

  • jlawler

    jlawler

    March 10, 2015, 6:56 am

    Also from chicago, also glad we didn't get it.

    Look at our history: Ryan and Blagojevich are the last 2 governors and have been indicted/convicted of white collar crimes. What makes you think that any real percentage of funds intended for the olympics transportation/jobs/builldings would get to it's intended destination? I honestly think we'd have some billion dollar budget, and at least 10% would go to graft, and kickbacks. That's not counting the substandard work, people hiring their brothers to ghost payrolls, etc, etc.

    I think it wouldn't be a net economic negative if we didn't have a history of criminals in charge. Given that additional burden, it's insane to think it's a good idea.

    Reply

  • obgynkenobi

    obgynkenobi

    March 10, 2015, 3:32 pm

    I never regretted going to medical school. The life of a PA or NP is probably easier hours wise and responsibility wise but I don't think I would have enjoyed it so much. Surgery is fascinating to me. I enjoy "fixing" things and it's a very gratifying to see someone get better after a procedure. The flip side of that is the pain and the complications that unfortunately do happen but at the end of the day the great majority of people do get better and are helped by it. I didn't enjoy my cadaver lab in med school actually, cutting into a live body is an entirely different experience.

    Reply

  • Riovanes

    Riovanes

    March 11, 2015, 7:53 am

    You'll be fine on a game of Normal difficulty. One noob does not ruin everything at that level, there's a lot of allowance for mistakes. Once you've got some practice, try Advanced level, which is more challenging but still somewhat forgiving.

    On Expert level, or in Versus mode, one noob CAN make a huge difference. So once you're good enough to play at Advanced level, try out Versus. If anyone gives you shit for sucking as a zombie, just tell them straight up "I just got the game and I'm still new at being a zombie." PROTIP: Try and actually listen to their advice! The number one tip I have for playing as a zombie: DON'T ATTACK ALONE. All it does is waste your life and force you to sit out of action for 20+ seconds. One special zombie attacking does nothing. Four zombies attacking simultaneously can eradicate a team.

    The only really important thing is DON'T play Expert mode on Campaign until you're damn good at the game. Common infected will deal 20 damage per strike - that's 1/5 of your total health. On Expert mode, the only way to survive is to *not make mistakes*. (This is basically all I play btw :D )

    P.S. Something about this game makes it extremely competitive. I remember myself lambasting people as 'noobs' while playing the DEMO of L4D, before the actual game was even released. So if people do give you shit, don't feel bad, they just play too much L4D.

    Reply

  • Symphonic_Nightmare

    Symphonic_Nightmare

    March 11, 2015, 1:38 am

    Have you experienced the tender ministrations of any labels other than Roadrunner and if so how do they compare to Roadrunner? It seems that a lot of smaller, more niche-y labels are doing more for their artists (and getting handsomely rewarded) than the more well known labels.

    There's been a lot of online arguing about the continued need for labels to exist and that perhaps artists should just self distribute and promote.

    I guess the real question is, do you find being signed to Roadrunner a positive experience that frees you up to worry about the more creative parts of recording and playing music?

    Reply

  • focks

    focks

    March 10, 2015, 6:35 pm

    My daughter is four. Here are some things we do together:

    * Tell stories and paint the main ideas.

    * Cook and bake, but we use a lot of food colouring to make it more fun.

    * Read a TON of books. Not toddler books, but more like 1st or 2nd grade books. She loves being able to point at the words and follow along

    * Nature walks and treasure hunts! She loves walking around outside, so we make a list of things we need to find. Three red rocks, two yellow leaves, five sticks the size of your pinky. That sort of thing.

    * Building things. Anything. Right now we're building a large terrarium for our pythons, and she thinks it's awesome when she gets to mark the lines on wood, or hand over supplies.

    * Sidewalk chalk. I cannot emphasize this one enough. Kids + sidewalk chalk = hours of entertainment and learning.

    * Make up songs about the things we're doing. If we're cleaning the house, we sing about what toys we're picking up or what furniture we're wiping off.

    * Pictures!! I have two cameras, and she uses the older one. We take pictures of everything, and she absolutely *loves* it.

    * If we have time/money, we love to go to the zoo. Some kids are afraid of it, though.

    Just ask him what he wants to do. Kids may not seem like they know exactly what's going on in the world, but if you ask him what he wants to do, I'm betting he can tell you exactly what's going through his mind.

    Reply

  • runawaycyborg

    runawaycyborg

    March 11, 2015, 6:48 am

    hey, what you're doing is awesome! i'm a single dad and super unemployed so i get to spend most of my days w/ my son who is 3 and a half.

    tv can help out as long as it's educational, like nick jr (use to be called noggin), but my son tends to learn more through music, a lot like i did. we make songs up and go over some of older kid songs and those really seem to help. Especially with his ABC's.

    Also, reading books to him, especially subjects he/she is interested in will help out w/ learning to read and eventually writing.

    My favorite part of the day is I show him things I'm interested in (haha), partly b/c he's curious and also it gives me a break. It refreshes you. I'm a drummer so we play drums, learn Iron Maiden songs and watch Transformers/Look @ Marvel Comics, etc.

    Yeah, being a dad is awesome!!!

    Reply

  • cassidoodle

    cassidoodle

    March 10, 2015, 8:51 pm

    Hm, I did the same thing. Napster was the thing while I was in high school, I mean at that time I was still able to find all sorts of rare and wonderful albums for free. I liked them so much (and I was younger, and pretentious about rare music when I was younger so) I bought every one I could find on Amazon. Thousands of dollars' worth of extremely rare albums.

    Then, they all got fucking stolen from my car.

    I'm lucky that I still have all the album art, because that was essentially what I paid for anyhow.

    Reply

  • Zoomerdog

    Zoomerdog

    March 11, 2015, 3:31 am

    When I was a kid, doctors made house calls (I remember them) and the prices -- for house calls, office visits, surgery, you name it -- were, for the most part, very cheap. American health care was widely hailed as the best in the world, government interference was low enough that many doctors, churches, and other groups ran free clinics or hospitals for the poor. As with the electronics industry, medical care, including pharmaceuticals, was affordable because government mandates and regulations weren't pricing it into the stratosphere. (Yes, regulation is important; see Underwriter Labs, a private firm testing and regulating electrical and other products for over a century, for how it should be done -- absent government power for corporations to buy, regulation works MUCH better).

    Real healthcare reform would involve getting government the heck out of our lives in the area of medical care and drugs. Nothing else, and especially not MORE government involvement, will do the job.

    If America were still a wealthy nation it could add government-run healthcare to its current obligations and at least expect things to function well for a while, although over time, using politicians to run the healthcare system degrades it (long wait times, rationing, refusal to pay for expensive procedures and medicines, etc. -- all common problems in nations with national healthcare). But America is NOT wealthy anymore. America is the most indebted nation in the history of the world, and believe me: the economic problems we've seen since 2007 are just the start.

    We don't have enough wealth for the federal government to provide healthcare, or even to withstand all the inefficiencies and other problems caused by government's CURRENT level of interference in our health care system.

    Want healthcare to be cheap, effective, high-tech, constantly improving, and otherwise similar to what you have with computers, electronics, other other tech-heavy market segments? Then get clear on Ringo's Law: Everything Government Touches Turns to Crap.

    Reply

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